Tagged Feature

Book Review: How to Stop Time by Matt Haig

I am old. That is the first things to tell you. The thing you are least likely to believe. If you saw me you would probably think I was about forty, but you would be very wrong. I am old– old in the way that a tree, or a quahog clam, or a Renaissance painting…

Book Review: The Immortalists by Chloe Benjamin

The Immortalists by Chloe Benjamin introduces the four Gold siblings as they dance on the edge of reality when they visit a rumored fortune-teller who can predict the dates of their deaths. Each sibling must visit the woman alone, choosing only after to share with the others her prediction. As they grow, the secret of her…

Book Review: The Good People by Hannah Kent

The Good People are cunning when are not merry. The do what pleases them because they serve neither God nor Devil, and no one can assure them of a place in Heaven or Hell. Not good enough to be saved , and not bad enough to be lost. In Hannah Kent’s second novel, The Good…

Book Review: The History of Bees by Maja Lunde

“The bees are dying, Dad. We’re the only ones who can do anything about it.” Oscillating between three narratives set in three different time periods, The History of Bees by Maja Lunde highlights the unparalleled importance of bees and what happens to humanity as they begin to disappear and eventually vanish. When I came to…

Book Review: The Bedlam Stacks by Natasha Pulley

“We are…wanted to steal a plant whose exact location nobody knows, in territory now defended by quinine barons under the protection of the government, and inhabited by tribal Indians who also hate foreigners and have killed everyone who’s got close in the last ten years.” The Bedlam Stacks by Natasha Pulley opens with Merrick Tremayne…

Book Review: Hum If You Don’t Know The Words by Bianca Marais

It had been an ordinary Sunday in every way. My parents fought and then made up and then fought again, switching from being adversaries to allies so seamlessly that you couldn’t put your finger on the moment when the lines were crossed and recrossed. Cat perfectly acted out her part of the quiet understudy twin,…

Book Review: The Lost Letter by Jillian Cantor

The sudden cold butt of the gun against her temple surprised her. She didn’t even let out a cry before the man grabbed her arm, and the letters fell from her hands, onto the unblemished snow. In Austria in 1938 the Nazi party is gaining a foot-hold and Kristoff is forced to witness Jewish families…