From March, 2018

Book Review: The Adulterants by Joe Dunthorne

The Adulterants by Joe Dunthorne highlights the life of one exceptionally self-centered and incompetent 30-something man. Ray works as a internet journalist, writing about the latest developments in technology—a freelance position that allows him the unusual freedom to drink well into the night or picnic on a weekday afternoon, all the while his pregnant wife,…

Book Review: Freshwater by Akwaeke Emezi

All the madnesses, each and every blinding one, they can all be traced back to the gates. Those carved monstrosities, those clay and chalk portals, existing everywhere and nowhere and all at once. They open, things are born, they close. The opening is easy, a pushing out, am expansion, an inhalation: the dust of divinity…

Book Review: Green by Sam Graham-Felsen

With all the humor and awkwardness expected of a coming-of-age novel, Sam Graham-Felsen writes about the parlous nature of life’s important lessons in his debut novel, Green. Set in the years following the L.A. riots which led to some of America’s most harrowing racial conflict, this story illuminates the fragility of adolescent friendship when race,…

Book Review: The Great Alone by Kristin Hannah

In her highly anticipated follow up to The Nightingale Kristin Hannah pulls from her family’s past as Alaskan homesteaders and delivers yet another stunning portrayal of feminine strength. The Great Alone follows Leni and her parents as they embark on the ultimate test of survival, where their every weakness is exploited and they must rise…